Gardening Articles

 

Gardening articles you may be interested in reviewing are posted below:

1. Propagating Lillies – Text by Brian Matthew Propagating Lilies – July_August 2000

2. Growing Beebalm  Growing Beebalm

 

3.  Evaluation of Veronica and Veronicastrum EvaluationofVeronicaandVeronicastrum

4.  Native Plants that Feed our Butterflies and Birds  from Bringing Nature Home:  How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native
Plants by Dr. Doug
Tallamy, Timber Press, 2007Typical gardens often are barren wastelands to native
insects and thus birds.   Almost all
North American birds other than seabirds — 96 percent — feed their young with
insects and caterpillars, which contain more protein than beef.Gardeners could slow the rate of extinction of our
native wildlife and birds by including native plants in their yards. A
patch of violets will feed fritillary caterpillars. A patch of phlox could
support eight species of butterflies. The buttonbush shrub, which has little
white flowers, feeds 18 species of butterflies and moths; and blueberry bushes
support 288 species of moths and butterflies.

Best Bets: Favorite trees and bushes for
mid-Atlantic butterflies & Moths

Common Name

 

Plant Genus # of Butterfly / Moth species supported
Oak Quercus

534

Black cherry Prunus

456

Willow Salix

455

Birch Betula

413

Poplar Populus

368

Crabapple Malus

311

Blueberry Vaccinium

288

Maple Acer

285

Elm Ulmus

213

Pine Pinus

203

Hickory Carya

200

Hawthorn Crataegus

159

Spruce Picea

156

Alder Alnus

156

Basswood Tilia

150

Ash Fraxinus

150

Rose Rosa

139

Filbert Corylus

131

Walnut Juglans

130

Beech Fagus

126

Chestnut Castanea

125

 

 

Best Bets: Favorite
flowers and herbaceous plants

for

mid-Atlantic
butterflies & Moths

Common Name

 

Plant Genus # of Butterfly / Moth species supported
Goldenrod Solidago

115

Asters Aster

112

Sunflower Helianthus

73

Joe pye  (Boneset) Eupatorium

42

Morning glory Ipomoea

39

Sedges Carex

36

Honeysuckle Lonicera

36

Lupine Lupinus

33

Violets Viola

29

Geraniums Geranium

23

Black-eyed susan Rudbeckia

17

Iris Iris

17

Evening primrose Oenothera

16

Milkweed Asclepias

12

Verbena Verbena

11

Beardtongue Penstemon

8

Phlox Phlox

8

Bee balm Monarda

7

Veronica Veronica

6

Little bluestem Schizachyrium

6

Cardinal flower Lobelia

4

 

from
Bringing Nature Home:  How You Can Sustain
Wildlife with Native Plants

Best Native Plants for Wildlife_Doug Tallamy_3-24-12
by Dr. Doug Tallamy, Timber Press,
2007

Better Vegetable Varieties for Northeast TN/SW Virginia Gardeners by R. Allen Straw
Edit

 

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